Changeset 510


Ignore:
Timestamp:
Aug 26, 2005 5:45:32 PM (15 years ago)
Author:
andreasw
Message:

final touches to release as first official version 3.0.0 (to be copied to trunk)

Location:
branches/dev
Files:
18 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • branches/dev/AUTHORS

    r425 r510  
    11Main authors:
    22
    3 - Andreas Waechter (IBM)
    4 - Carl Laird (IBM, CMU)
     3Andreas Waechter, project leader (IBM)
     4Carl Laird (IBM, Carnegie Mellon University)
    55
    66
     
    1111  PDSystemImpl/PDFullSpace/IpTAUCSSolverInterface.hpp
    1212  PDSystemImpl/PDFullSpace/IpTAUCSSolverInterface.cpp
     13
     14- Yoshiaki Kawajiri (Carnegie Mellon Univeristy):
     15  First version of Latex documentation file
     16
     17  Docs/documentation.tex
  • branches/dev/Algorithm/IpDefaultIterateInitializer.cpp

    r501 r510  
    100100    // Now we compute the initial values that the algorithm is going to
    101101    // actually use.  We first store them in the trial fields in ip_data.
    102 
    103     // ToDo combine the following code with warm_start_intializer
    104102
    105103    // Push the x iterates sufficiently inside the bounds
  • branches/dev/Algorithm/IpFilter.hpp

    r501 r510  
    3939      DBG_ASSERT((Index)vals.size() == ncoor);
    4040
    41       // ToDo decide where we can get Compare_le from
     41      // ToDo decide if we need Compare_le
    4242      bool retval = false;
    4343      for (Index i=0; i<ncoor; i++) {
  • branches/dev/Algorithm/IpFilterLineSearch.cpp

    r498 r510  
    328328    options.GetIntegerValue("watchdog_shortened_iter_trigger", watchdog_shortened_iter_trigger_, prefix);
    329329
    330     // ToDo decide if also the PDSystemSolver should be initialized here...
    331 
    332330    rigorous_ = true;
    333331    skipped_line_search_ = false;
  • branches/dev/Algorithm/IpIpoptAlg.cpp

    r498 r510  
    258258
    259259    DBG_PRINT_VECTOR(2, "rhs", *rhs);
    260 
    261     //ToDo: allow us to delete entries in IpData to save memory?
    262     // To save memory, delete the old search directions
    263     //     IpData().SetFromPtr_delta_x(NULL);
    264     //     IpData().SetFromPtr_delta_s(NULL);
    265     //     IpData().SetFromPtr_delta_y_c(NULL);
    266     //     IpData().SetFromPtr_delta_y_d(NULL);
    267     //     IpData().SetFromPtr_delta_z_L(NULL);
    268     //     IpData().SetFromPtr_delta_z_U(NULL);
    269     //     IpData().SetFromPtr_delta_v_L(NULL);
    270     //     IpData().SetFromPtr_delta_v_U(NULL);
    271260
    272261    // Get space for the search direction
  • branches/dev/Algorithm/IpIpoptData.cpp

    r493 r510  
    229229    trial_ = NULL;
    230230
    231     // ToDo: Why don't we free the delta_ here?
    232 
    233231    // Free the memory for the affine-scaling step
    234232    delta_aff_ = NULL;
  • branches/dev/Algorithm/IpMonotoneMuUpdate.hpp

    r501 r510  
    3636                                const std::string& prefix);
    3737
    38     /** Method for determining the barrier parameter for the next iteration.
    39      *  When the optimality error for the current barrier parameter is less than
    40      *  a tolerance, the barrier parameter is reduced, and the Reset method of the
    41      *  LineSearch object linesearch is called.
    42      *  TODO: MORE DETAILS HERE */
     38    /** Method for determining the barrier parameter for the next
     39     *  iteration.  When the optimality error for the current barrier
     40     *  parameter is less than a tolerance, the barrier parameter is
     41     *  reduced, and the Reset method of the LineSearch object
     42     *  linesearch is called. */
    4343    virtual void UpdateBarrierParameter();
    4444
  • branches/dev/Algorithm/IpPDFullSpaceSolver.cpp

    r501 r510  
    415415      Index numberOfEVals=rhs.y_c()->Dim()+rhs.y_d()->Dim();
    416416      // counter for the number of trial evaluations
    417       // (ToDo is not at the corrent place)
     417      // (ToDo is not at the correct place)
    418418      Index count = 0;
    419419
  • branches/dev/Algorithm/IpWarmStartIterateInitializer.cpp

    r501 r510  
    204204        *IpNLP().Px_L(),
    205205        *IpNLP().Px_U());
    206 
    207     // ToDo: Don't see why this line is required
    208     //    IpData().SetTrialPrimalVariablesFromPtr(new_x, new_s);
    209206
    210207    // Push the primal s variables
  • branches/dev/Common/IpRegOptions.cpp

    r508 r510  
    191191      MakeValidLatexString(default_string_, buff);
    192192      jnlst.Printf(J_SUMMARY, J_DOCUMENTATION,
    193                    "\nThe default value for this string option is \"%s\".\n",
    194                    buff.c_str());
     193                   "\nThe default value for this string option is \"%s\".\n",
     194                   buff.c_str());
    195195
    196196      jnlst.Printf(J_SUMMARY, J_DOCUMENTATION, "\\\\ \nPossible values:\n");
  • branches/dev/Common/IpSmartPtr.hpp

    r501 r510  
    166166  {
    167167  public:
    168     // ToDo the following didn't work on AIX
    169     //static const Index dbg_smartptr_verbosity = 0;
    170168#define dbg_smartptr_verbosity 0
    171169
  • branches/dev/Docs/documentation.tex

    r509 r510  
    4545  The initial version of this document was created by
    4646  Yoshiaki Kawajir\footnote{Department of Chemical Engineering,
    47     Carnegie Mellon Univeristy, Pittsburgh PA} as a course project for
     47    Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh PA} as a course project for
    4848  \textit{47852 Open Source Software for Optimization}, taught by
    4949  Prof. Fran\c cois Margot at Tepper School of Business, Carnegie
    5050  Mellon University.  The current version is maintained by Carl
    5151  Laird\footnote{Department of Chemical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon
    52     Univeristy, Pittsburgh PA} and Andreas
     52    University, Pittsburgh PA} and Andreas
    5353  W\"achter\footnote{Department of Mathematical Sciences, IBM T.J.\
    5454    Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY}.
     
    6161\noindent
    6262The following names used in this document are trademarks or registered
    63 trademarks: AMPL, Intel, Miscrosoft, Visual Studio C++, Visual Studio
     63trademarks: AMPL, Intel, Microsoft, Visual Studio C++, Visual Studio
    6464C++ .NET
    6565\end{small}
     
    124124  \Ipopt\ distribution compile it automatically.
    125125\item A sparse symmetric indefinite linear solver. The \Ipopt\ needs
    126   to obtain the solution of sparse, symmtric, indefinite linear
     126  to obtain the solution of sparse, symmetric, indefinite linear
    127127  systems, and for this it relies on third-party code.  Currently,
    128128  your only option is the solver MA27 from the Harwell Subroutine
     
    131131
    132132  Furthermore, we also make use a subroutine for scaling the linear
    133   systems arsing in \Ipopt, using the HSL routine MC19.  It is not
     133  systems arising in \Ipopt, using the HSL routine MC19.  It is not
    134134  required to have MC19 to compile \Ipopt; if this routine is missing,
    135135  the scaling is never performed.
     
    290290\subsection{Download External Code}\label{ExternalCode}
    291291\Ipopt\ uses a few external packages that are not included in the
    292 \Ipopt\ source code distribution, namely ASL (the Ampl Solver
     292\Ipopt\ source code distribution, namely ASL (the AMPL Solver
    293293Library), BLAS, and some sparse linear algebra routines from the
    294294Harwell Subroutine Library.
     
    353353Note: Whereas currently obtaining MA27 is essential for using \Ipopt,
    354354MC19 could be omitted (with the consequence that you cannot use this
    355 method for scaling the linear systems arsing inside the \Ipopt\
     355method for scaling the linear systems arising inside the \Ipopt\
    356356algorithm).
    357357
     
    362362basic steps that should work on most systems.  For special
    363363compilations and some for troubleshooting see
    364 Appendix~\ref{ExpertInstall} and consult the \Ipopt\ webpage before
     364Appendix~\ref{ExpertInstall} and consult the \Ipopt\ homepage before
    365365submitting a ticket or sending a message to the mailing list.
    366366\begin{enumerate}
     
    403403
    404404There are two ways to install \Ipopt\ on Windows systems.  The first
    405 option, described in ection~\ref{CygwinInstall}, is to use Cygwin (see
     405option, described in Section~\ref{CygwinInstall}, is to use Cygwin (see
    406406\texttt{www.cygwin.com}), which offers a UNIX-like environment
    407407on Windows and in which the installation procedure described earlier
     
    11211121The boolean variable {\tt new\_x} will be false if the last call to
    11221122any of the evaluation methods used the same $x$ values. This can be
    1123 helpful when users have efficient implementations that caclulate
     1123helpful when users have efficient implementations that calculate
    11241124multiple outputs at once. \Ipopt\ internally caches results from the
    11251125{\tt TNLP} and generally, this flag can be ignored.
     
    12311231The boolean variable {\tt new\_x} will be false if the last call to
    12321232any of the evaluation methods used the same $x$ values. This can be
    1233 helpful when users have efficient implementations that caclulate
     1233helpful when users have efficient implementations that calculate
    12341234multiple outputs at once. \Ipopt\ internally caches results from the
    12351235{\tt TNLP} and generally, this flag can be ignored.
     
    13241324false if the last call to any of the evaluation methods used the same
    13251325values. This can be helpful when users have efficient implementations
    1326 that caclulate multiple outputs at once. \Ipopt\ internally caches
     1326that calculate multiple outputs at once. \Ipopt\ internally caches
    13271327results from the {\tt TNLP} and generally, this flag can be ignored.
    13281328
     
    16541654  pointer to a C structure; you should not access this structure
    16551655  directly, only through the functions provided in the C interface.}
    1656 with the function {\tt CreateIpoptProblem}, which lateron has to be
     1656with the function {\tt CreateIpoptProblem}, which later has to be
    16571657passed to the {\tt IpoptSolve} function.
    16581658
     
    16801680information between the main program that calls {\tt IpoptSolve} and
    16811681any of the callback functions.  This pointer is simply passed
    1682 unmodified by \Ipopt\ amoung those functions.  For example, you can
     1682unmodified by \Ipopt\ among those functions.  For example, you can
    16831683use this to pass constants that define the optimization problem and
    16841684are computed before the optimization in the main C program to the
     
    19331933  The last argument of the {\tt EV\_*} subroutines, {\tt IERR}, is to
    19341934  be set to 0 by the users on return, unless there was a problem
    1935   during the evaluation of the optimnization problem
     1935  during the evaluation of the optimization problem
    19361936  function/derivative for the given point {\tt X} (then it should
    19371937  return a non-zero value).
     
    19421942Ipopt has many (maybe too many) options that can be adjusted for the
    19431943algorithm.  Options are all identified by a string name and their
    1944 values can be of one of three types, Number (real), Integer, or
     1944values can be of one of three types: Number (real), Integer, or
    19451945String. Number options are used for things like tolerances, integer
    19461946options are used for things like maximum number of iterations, and
     
    19481948scaling method. Options can be set through code, through the AMPL
    19491949interface if you are using AMPL, or by creating a {\tt PARAMS.DAT}
    1950 file in the directory you are executing Ipopt.
     1950file in the directory you are executing \Ipopt.
    19511951
    19521952The {\tt PARAMS.DAT} file is read line by line and each line should
     
    19651965# Set the max number of iterations
    19661966max_iter 500
    1967 
    19681967\end{verbatim}
    19691968is a valid {\tt PARAMS.DAT} file.
     
    19751974through AMPL, use the internal AMPL command {\tt options}.  For
    19761975example, \\
    1977 {\tt options ipopt ``nlp\_scaling\_method=none mu\_init=1e-2
    1978 max\_iter=500''} \\
     1976{\tt options ipopt "nlp\_scaling\_method=none mu\_init=1e-2
     1977max\_iter=500"} \\
    19791978is a valid options command in AMPL. The most common
    19801979options are referenced in Appendix~\ref{app.options_ref}. These are also
     
    19891988\ref{app.options_ref}. You can print the documentation for all \Ipopt\
    19901989options by adding the option, \\ {\tt print\_options\_documentation
    1991 yes} \\ and running \Ipopt\ (like the Ampl executable, for
     1990yes} \\ and running \Ipopt\ (like the AMPL executable, for
    19921991instance). This will output all of the options documentation to the
    19931992console.
     
    20192018\item[{\tt inf\_pr}:] The scaled primal infeasibility at the current point. In restoration, this value is the primal infeasibility of the original problem at the current point.
    20202019\item[{\tt inf\_du}:] The scaled dual infeasibility at the current point. In restoration, this is the value of the dual infeasibility for the restoration problem.
    2021 \item[{\tt lg(mu)}:] The value of the barrier parameter mu ($log_{10}$).
     2020\item[{\tt lg(mu)}:] $\log_{10}$ of the value of the barrier parameter mu.
    20222021\item[{\tt ||d||}:] The infinity norm (max) of the primal step (in x and s). In restoration, this value includes the values of the additional variables, $p$ and $n$.
    2023 \item[{\tt lg(rg)}:] The value of the regularization term for the Hessian of the Lagrangian ($log_{10}$).
     2022\item[{\tt lg(rg)}:] $\log_{10}$ of the value of the regularization term for the Hessian of the Lagrangian in the augmented system.
    20242023\item[{\tt alpha\_du}:] The stepsize for the dual variables.
    20252024\item[{\tt alpha\_pr}:] The stepsize for the primal variables.
     
    20332032\begin{description}
    20342033\item[{\tt Solve\_Succeeded}:] $\;$ \\
    2035 Console Message: {\tt EXIT: Optimal Solution Found.} \\
    2036 This message indicates that \Ipopt\ found a (locally) optimal
    2037 point within the desired tolerances.
     2034  Console Message: {\tt EXIT: Optimal Solution Found.} \\
     2035  This message indicates that \Ipopt\ found a (locally) optimal point
     2036  within the desired tolerances.
    20382037\item[{\tt Solved\_To\_Acceptable\_Level}:]  $\;$ \\
    2039 Console Message: {\tt EXIT: Solved To Acceptable Level.} \\
    2040 This indicates that was not converged to the desired tolerances, but was
    2041 converged to an acceptable level as specified by {\tt acceptable-*}
    2042 options. This may happen if the desired tolerances are too small for the
    2043 current problem.
     2038  Console Message: {\tt EXIT: Solved To Acceptable Level.} \\
     2039  This indicates that was not converged to the desired tolerances, but
     2040  was converged to an acceptable level as specified by {\tt
     2041    acceptable-*} options. This may happen if the desired tolerances
     2042  are too small for the current problem.
    20442043\item[{\tt Infeasible\_Problem\_Detected}:]  $\;$ \\
    2045 Console Message: {\tt EXIT: Converged to a point of
    2046 local infeasibility. Problem may be infeasible.} \\
    2047 The restoration phase converged to a point that was not feasible for the
    2048 original problem. This indicates that the problem may be infeasible, or that
    2049 the algorithm is stuck at a locally infeasible point.
     2044  Console Message: {\tt EXIT: Converged to a point of
     2045    local infeasibility. Problem may be infeasible.} \\
     2046  The restoration phase converged to a point that is a minimizer for
     2047  the constraint violation (in the $\ell_1$-norm), but is not feasible
     2048  for the original problem. This indicates that the problem may be
     2049  infeasible (or at least that the algorithm is stuck at a locally
     2050  infeasible point).  The returned point (the minimizer of the
     2051  constraint violation) might help you to find which constraint is
     2052  causing the problem.  If you believe that the NLP is feasible,
     2053  it might help to start the optimization from a different point.
    20502054\item[{\tt Search\_Direction\_Becomes\_Too\_Small}:]  $\;$ \\
    2051 Console Message: {\tt EXIT: Search Direction is becoming Too Small.} \\
    2052 This indicates that \Ipopt\ is calculating very small step sizes and
    2053 making very little progress.
    2054 This could happen if the problem has been solved to the best numerical
    2055 accuracy possible given the current scaling.
     2055  Console Message: {\tt EXIT: Search Direction is becoming Too Small.} \\
     2056  This indicates that \Ipopt\ is calculating very small step sizes and
     2057  making very little progress.  This could happen if the problem has
     2058  been solved to the best numerical accuracy possible given the
     2059  current scaling.
    20562060\item[{\tt Maximum\_Iterations\_Exceeded}:]  $\;$ \\
    2057 Console Message: {\tt EXIT: Maximum Number of Iterations Exceeded.} \\
    2058 This indicates that \Ipopt\ has exceeded the maximum number of
    2059 iterations as specified by the option {\tt max\_iter}.
     2061  Console Message: {\tt EXIT: Maximum Number of Iterations Exceeded.} \\
     2062  This indicates that \Ipopt\ has exceeded the maximum number of
     2063  iterations as specified by the option {\tt max\_iter}.
    20602064\item[{\tt Restoration\_Failed}:]  $\;$ \\
    2061 Console Message: {\tt EXIT: Restoration Failed!} \\
    2062 This indicates that the restoration phase failed to find
    2063 a feasible point that was acceptable to the filter line
    2064 search for the original problem. This could happen if the
    2065 problem is highly degenerate or if your NLP provides incorrect
    2066 derivative information.
     2065  Console Message: {\tt EXIT: Restoration Failed!} \\
     2066  This indicates that the restoration phase failed to find a feasible
     2067  point that was acceptable to the filter line search for the original
     2068  problem. This could happen if the problem is highly degenerate or if
     2069  your NLP provides incorrect derivative information.
    20672070\item[{\tt Invalid\_Option}:]  $\;$ \\
    2068 Console Message: (details about the particular error
    2069 will be output to the console) \\
    2070 This indicates that there was some problem specifying the options. See the
    2071 specific message for details.
     2071  Console Message: (details about the particular error
     2072  will be output to the console) \\
     2073  This indicates that there was some problem specifying the options.
     2074  See the specific message for details.
    20722075\item[{\tt Not\_Enough\_Degrees\_Of\_Freedom}:]  $\;$ \\
    2073 Console Message: {\tt EXIT: Problem has too few degrees of freedom.} \\
    2074 This indicates that your problem, as specified, has too few degrees of
    2075 freedom. This can happen if you have too many constraints, or if you
    2076 fix too many variables (\Ipopt\ removes fixed variables).
     2076  Console Message: {\tt EXIT: Problem has too few degrees of freedom.} \\
     2077  This indicates that your problem, as specified, has too few degrees
     2078  of freedom. This can happen if you have too many equality
     2079  constraints, or if you fix too many variables (\Ipopt\ removes fixed
     2080  variables).
    20772081\item[{\tt Invalid\_Problem\_Definition}:]  $\;$ \\
    2078 Console Message: (no console message, this is a return code for the
    2079 C and Fortran interfaces only.) \\
    2080 This indicates that there was an exception of some sort when building
    2081 the {\tt IpoptProblem} structure in the C or Fortran interface. Likely
    2082 there is an error in your model or the {\tt main} routine.
     2082  Console Message: (no console message, this is a return code for the
     2083  C and Fortran interfaces only.) \\
     2084  This indicates that there was an exception of some sort when
     2085  building the {\tt IpoptProblem} structure in the C or Fortran
     2086  interface. Likely there is an error in your model or the {\tt main}
     2087  routine.
    20832088\item[{\tt Unrecoverable\_Exception}:]  $\;$ \\
    2084 Console Message: (details about the particular error
    2085 will be output to the console) \\
    2086 This indicates that \Ipopt\ has thrown an exception that does
    2087 not have an internal return code. See the specific message for details.
     2089  Console Message: (details about the particular error
     2090  will be output to the console) \\
     2091  This indicates that \Ipopt\ has thrown an exception that does not
     2092  have an internal return code. See the specific message for details.
    20882093\item[{\tt NonIpopt\_Exception\_Thrown}:]  $\;$ \\
    2089 Console Message: {\tt Unknown Exception caught in Ipopt} \\
    2090 An unknown exception was caught in Ipopt. This exception could
    2091 have originated from your model or any linked in third party code.
     2094  Console Message: {\tt Unknown Exception caught in Ipopt} \\
     2095  An unknown exception was caught in \Ipopt. This exception could have
     2096  originated from your model or any linked in third party code.
    20922097\item[{\tt Insufficient\_Memory}:]  $\;$ \\
    2093 Console Message: {\tt EXIT: Not enough memory.} \\
    2094 An error occurred while trying to allocate memory. The problem may
    2095 be too large for your current memory and swap configuration.
     2098  Console Message: {\tt EXIT: Not enough memory.} \\
     2099  An error occurred while trying to allocate memory. The problem may
     2100  be too large for your current memory and swap configuration.
    20962101\item[{\tt Internal\_Error}:]  $\;$ \\
    2097 Console Message: {\tt EXIT: INTERNAL ERROR: Unknown SolverReturn
    2098 value - Notify IPOPT Authors.} \\
    2099 An unknown internal error has occurred. Please Notify the
    2100 authors of \Ipopt.
     2102  Console Message: {\tt EXIT: INTERNAL ERROR: Unknown SolverReturn
     2103    value - Notify IPOPT Authors.} \\
     2104  An unknown internal error has occurred. Please notify the authors of
     2105  \Ipopt.
    21012106
    21022107\end{description}
     
    22662271\section{The Smart Pointer Implementation: {\tt SmartPtr<T>}} \label{app.smart_ptr}
    22672272
    2268 The SmartPtr class is described in {\tt IpSmartPtr.hpp}. It is a
     2273The {\tt SmartPtr} class is described in {\tt IpSmartPtr.hpp}. It is a
    22692274template class that takes care of deleting objects for us so we need
    22702275not be concerned about memory leaks. Instead of pointing to an object
    2271 with a raw C++ pointer (e.g. {\tt HS071\_NLP*}), we use a SmartPtr.
    2272 Every time a SmartPtr is set to reference an object, it increments a
    2273 counter in that object (see the ReferencedObject base class if you are
    2274 interested). If a SmartPtr is done with the object, either by leaving
    2275 scope or being set to point to another object, the counter is
    2276 decremented. When the count of the object goes to zero, the object is
    2277 automatically deleted. SmartPtr's are very simple, just use them as
    2278 you would a standard pointer.
    2279 
    2280 It is very important to use SmartPtr's instead of raw pointers when
    2281 passing objects to \Ipopt. Internally, \Ipopt\ uses smart pointers for
    2282 referencing objects. If you use a raw pointer in your executable, the
    2283 object's counter will NOT get incremented. Then, when \Ipopt\ uses smart
    2284 pointers inside its own code, the counter will get
     2276with a raw C++ pointer (e.g. {\tt HS071\_NLP*}), we use a {\tt
     2277  SmartPtr}.  Every time a {\tt SmartPtr} is set to reference an
     2278object, it increments a counter in that object (see the {\tt
     2279  ReferencedObject} base class if you are interested). If a {\tt
     2280  SmartPtr} is done with the object, either by leaving scope or being
     2281set to point to another object, the counter is decremented. When the
     2282count of the object goes to zero, the object is automatically deleted.
     2283{\tt SmartPtr}'s are very simple, just use them as you would a
     2284standard pointer.
     2285
     2286It is very important to use {\tt SmartPtr}'s instead of raw pointers
     2287when passing objects to \Ipopt. Internally, \Ipopt\ uses smart
     2288pointers for referencing objects. If you use a raw pointer in your
     2289executable, the object's counter will NOT get incremented. Then, when
     2290\Ipopt\ uses smart pointers inside its own code, the counter will get
    22852291incremented. However, before \Ipopt\ returns control to your code, it
    22862292will decrement as many times as it incremented and the counter will
    2287 return to zero. Therefore, \Ipopt\ will delete the object. When control
    2288 returns to you, you now have a raw pointer that points to a deleted
    2289 object.
     2293return to zero. Therefore, \Ipopt\ will delete the object. When
     2294control returns to you, you now have a raw pointer that points to a
     2295deleted object.
    22902296
    22912297This might sound difficult to anyone not familiar with the use of
     
    23422348\item Similarly, if you have a precompiled library containing the
    23432349  Harwell Subroutines, you can specify its location with the
    2344   \verb|--with-hsl| flag.
     2350  \verb|--with-hsl| flag.  And the location of the AMPL solver library
     2351  (with the ASL header files) can be specified with
     2352  \verb|--with-asldir|.
    23452353
    23462354\item If you want to specify that you want to use particular
     
    23702378  library {\tt libipopt.a} and the linker complains about missing
    23712379  symbols from C++ (e.g., the standard template library), you should
    2372   specify the C++ libraries with the CXXLIBS variable.  To find out
     2380  specify the C++ libraries with the {\tt CXXLIBS} variable.  To find out
    23732381  what those libraries are, it is probably helpful to link a C++
    23742382  program with verbose compiler output.
     
    23792387  {\tt ./configure CC=icc F77=ifort CXX=icpc $\backslash$\\ \hspace*{14ex} CXXLIBS='-L/usr/lib/gcc-lib/i386-redhat-linux/3.2.3 -lstdc++'}
    23802388
    2381 \item Compilation in 64bit sometimes requires some espicial
     2389\item Compilation in 64bit sometimes requires some special
    23822390  consideration.  For example, for compilation of 64bit code on AIX,
    23832391  we recommend the following configuration
     
    23962404  the {\tt configure} variables {\tt AR}, {\tt ARFLAGS}, and {\tt
    23972405    AR\_X} are provided.  Here, {\tt AR} specifies the command for the
    2398   archiver for creating an archive, and {\tt ARFLAGS} speficies
    2399   additional flags.  {\tt AR\_X} contains the command for extracing
     2406  archiver for creating an archive, and {\tt ARFLAGS} specifies
     2407  additional flags.  {\tt AR\_X} contains the command for extracting
    24002408  all files from an archive.  For example, the default setting for SUN
    24012409  compilers for our configure script is
     
    24112419  debugging something.
    24122420
     2421\item It is not necessary to produce the binary files in the
     2422  directories where the source files are.  If you want to compile the
     2423  code on different systems on a shared file system, you can keep one
     2424  single copy of the source files in one directory, and the binary
     2425  files for each configuration in separate directories.  For this,
     2426  simply run the configure script in the directory where you want the
     2427  base directory for the \Ipopt\ binary files.  For example:
     2428
     2429  {\tt \$ mkdir \$HOME/Ipopt-objects}\\
     2430  {\tt \$ cd \$HOME/Ipopt-objects}\\
     2431  {\tt \$ \$HOME/Ipopt/trunk/configure}
     2432
    24132433\end{itemize}
    24142434
  • branches/dev/Docs/options.tex

    r508 r510  
    55$0 \le {\tt print\_level } \le 10$
    66and its default value is $3$.
    7 
    8 
    9 \paragraph{pivtol:} Pivot tolerance for the linear solver MA27. $\;$ \\
    10  A smaller number pivots for sparsity, a larger
    11 number pivots for stability. The valid range for this real option is
    12 $0 <  {\tt pivtol } <  1$
    13 and its default value is $1 \cdot 10^{-08}$.
    14 
    15 
    16 \paragraph{pivtolmax:} Maximum pivot tolerance. $\;$ \\
    17  Ipopt may increase pivtol as high as pivtolmax to
    18 get a more accurate solution to the linear system. The valid range for this real option is
    19 $0 <  {\tt pivtolmax } <  1$
    20 and its default value is $0.0001$.
    217
    228
     
    7561threshold. The valid range for this real option is
    7662$0 <  {\tt constr\_viol\_tol } <  {\tt +inf}$
     63and its default value is $0.0001$.
     64
     65
     66\paragraph{pivtol:} Pivot tolerance for the linear solver MA27. $\;$ \\
     67 A smaller number pivots for sparsity, a larger
     68number pivots for stability. The valid range for this real option is
     69$0 <  {\tt pivtol } <  1$
     70and its default value is $1 \cdot 10^{-08}$.
     71
     72
     73\paragraph{pivtolmax:} Maximum pivot tolerance. $\;$ \\
     74 Ipopt may increase pivtol as high as pivtolmax to
     75get a more accurate solution to the linear system. The valid range for this real option is
     76$0 <  {\tt pivtolmax } <  1$
    7777and its default value is $0.0001$.
    7878
  • branches/dev/Interfaces/IpIpoptApplication.cpp

    r508 r510  
    121121          std::list<std::string> options_to_print;
    122122          options_to_print.push_back("print_level");
    123           options_to_print.push_back("pivtol");
    124           options_to_print.push_back("pivtolmax");
    125123          options_to_print.push_back("tol");
    126124          options_to_print.push_back("compl_inf_tol");
     
    128126          options_to_print.push_back("constr_mult_init_max");
    129127          options_to_print.push_back("constr_viol_tol");
     128          options_to_print.push_back("pivtol");
     129          options_to_print.push_back("pivtolmax");
    130130          options_to_print.push_back("mu_strategy");
    131131          options_to_print.push_back("mu_init");
  • branches/dev/Windows/VisualStudio_dotNET/include/config.h

    r475 r510  
    119119
    120120/* Define to the full name and version of this package. */
    121 #define PACKAGE_STRING "Ipopt 3.0.-1"
     121#define PACKAGE_STRING "Ipopt 3.0.0"
    122122
    123123/* Define to the one symbol short name of this package. */
     
    125125
    126126/* Define to the version of this package. */
    127 #define PACKAGE_VERSION "3.0.-1"
     127#define PACKAGE_VERSION "3.0.0"
    128128
    129129/* Define to 1 if you have the ANSI C header files. */
     
    131131
    132132/* Version number of package */
    133 #define VERSION "3.0.-1"
     133#define VERSION "3.0.0"
  • branches/dev/configure

    r507 r510  
    11#! /bin/sh
    2 # From configure.ac 3.0.-1.
     2# From configure.ac 3.0.0.
    33# Guess values for system-dependent variables and create Makefiles.
    4 # Generated by GNU Autoconf 2.59 for Ipopt 3.0.-1.
     4# Generated by GNU Autoconf 2.59 for Ipopt 3.0.0.
    55#
    66# Report bugs to <coin-ipopt@www-124.ibm.com>.
     
    277277PACKAGE_NAME='Ipopt'
    278278PACKAGE_TARNAME='ipopt'
    279 PACKAGE_VERSION='3.0.-1'
    280 PACKAGE_STRING='Ipopt 3.0.-1'
     279PACKAGE_VERSION='3.0.0'
     280PACKAGE_STRING='Ipopt 3.0.0'
    281281PACKAGE_BUGREPORT='coin-ipopt@www-124.ibm.com'
    282282
     
    829829  # This message is too long to be a string in the A/UX 3.1 sh.
    830830  cat <<_ACEOF
    831 \`configure' configures Ipopt 3.0.-1 to adapt to many kinds of systems.
     831\`configure' configures Ipopt 3.0.0 to adapt to many kinds of systems.
    832832
    833833Usage: $0 [OPTION]... [VAR=VALUE]...
     
    894894if test -n "$ac_init_help"; then
    895895  case $ac_init_help in
    896      short | recursive ) echo "Configuration of Ipopt 3.0.-1:";;
     896     short | recursive ) echo "Configuration of Ipopt 3.0.0:";;
    897897   esac
    898898  cat <<\_ACEOF
     
    10391039if $ac_init_version; then
    10401040  cat <<\_ACEOF
    1041 Ipopt configure 3.0.-1
     1041Ipopt configure 3.0.0
    10421042generated by GNU Autoconf 2.59
    10431043
     
    10591059running configure, to aid debugging if configure makes a mistake.
    10601060
    1061 It was created by Ipopt $as_me 3.0.-1, which was
     1061It was created by Ipopt $as_me 3.0.0, which was
    10621062generated by GNU Autoconf 2.59.  Invocation command line was
    10631063
     
    20662066      icpc | */icpc) ;;
    20672067      *)
    2068 # ToDo decide aboiut unroll-loops
     2068# ToDo decide about unroll-loops
    20692069        opt_cxxflags="-O3"
    20702070#        case $build in
     
    53935393# Define the identity of the package.
    53945394 PACKAGE='ipopt'
    5395  VERSION='3.0.-1'
     5395 VERSION='3.0.0'
    53965396
    53975397
     
    1072110721cat >&5 <<_CSEOF
    1072210722
    10723 This file was extended by Ipopt $as_me 3.0.-1, which was
     10723This file was extended by Ipopt $as_me 3.0.0, which was
    1072410724generated by GNU Autoconf 2.59.  Invocation command line was
    1072510725
     
    1078710787cat >>$CONFIG_STATUS <<_ACEOF
    1078810788ac_cs_version="\\
    10789 Ipopt config.status 3.0.-1
     10789Ipopt config.status 3.0.0
    1079010790configured by $0, generated by GNU Autoconf 2.59,
    1079110791  with options \\"`echo "$ac_configure_args" | sed 's/[\\""\`\$]/\\\\&/g'`\\"
  • branches/dev/configure.ac

    r507 r510  
    99AC_PREREQ(2.59)
    1010
    11 AC_INIT([Ipopt],[3.0.-1],[coin-ipopt@www-124.ibm.com])
     11AC_INIT([Ipopt],[3.0.0],[coin-ipopt@www-124.ibm.com])
    1212
    1313AC_COPYRIGHT([
     
    1717under the Common Public License.])
    1818
    19 AC_REVISION(3.0.-1)
     19AC_REVISION(3.0.0)
    2020
    2121AC_CONFIG_SRCDIR(Common/IpDebug.hpp)
     
    6060      icpc | */icpc) ;;
    6161      *)
    62 # ToDo decide aboiut unroll-loops
     62# ToDo decide about unroll-loops
    6363        opt_cxxflags="-O3"
    6464#        case $build in
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