Changes between Version 3 and Version 4 of pm-autotools-intro


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Timestamp:
May 31, 2006 3:24:34 PM (14 years ago)
Author:
andreasw
Comment:

minor update

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  • pm-autotools-intro

    v3 v4  
    33== Autoconf ==
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    5 Everybody, who has downloaded and installed a GNU package, has seen the {{{configure}}} step in the installation process.  Autoconf is the software that generates the rather complicated shell script "{{{configure}}}" from a simply input file, which is called {{{configure.ac}}}.
     5Everybody, who has downloaded and installed a GNU package, has seen the {{{configure}}} step in the installation process.  Autoconf is the software that generates this rather complicated shell script "{{{configure}}}" from a simply input file, which is called {{{configure.ac}}}.
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    77The goal of Autoconf is to provide developers of open source software with an easy way to ensure portability of their code.  Autoconf can perform tests to find out platform and compiler dependent properties, such as the presence of certain program, libraries, or header files.  The {{{configure}}} script is a shell script for {{{/bin/sh}}}, i.e., the basic shell that is available on every UNIX-like system (including Linux, Cygwin, and MSys).  The attempt is made to write this script so that it will work on almost every such system, and therefore the least common denominator of all platforms is taken.
     
    1111=== Template Files ===
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    13 At completion, the {{{configure}}} script will have generated some ''output files'' (such as a {{{Makefile}}}), based on a template for this file, that has the extension {{{.in}}} (e.g., {{{Makefile.in}}}).  The template files contain strings (autoconf variable names) surrounded by {{{@}}}.  For example, the autoconf variable for the name of the C compiler is {{{CC}}}, and in the template for a makefile you will find a line like
     13At completion, the {{{configure}}} script will have generated some ''output files'' (such as a {{{Makefile}}}), based on a template for this file, that has the extension {{{.in}}} (e.g., {{{Makefile.in}}}).  The template files contain strings (autoconf output variable names) surrounded by {{{@}}}.  For example, the autoconf variable for the name of the C compiler is {{{CC}}}, and in the template for a makefile you will find a line like
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    1515{{{